Navigation News Annual Scientific Meeting Participants Program Posters Information for presenters HPC Live Helpdesk Events Welcome reception Social Outing to MBO Harley Wood Public Lecture ASA Conference Dinner Prizes ASA Student Prizes Anne Green Prize Bok Prize Charlene Heisler Prize David Allen Prize Harley Wood Lecture Louise Webster Prize Policies Sponsors HWSA 2018
News Annual Scientific Meeting News Participants Program Posters Information for presenters HPC Live Helpdesk Events Welcome reception Social Outing to MBO Harley Wood Public Lecture ASA Conference Dinner Prizes ASA Student Prizes Anne Green Prize Bok Prize Charlene Heisler Prize David Allen Prize Harley Wood Lecture Louise Webster Prize Policies Sponsors HWSA 2018

Harley Wood Lecture

ASA Annual Scientific Meeting 2018

The Harley Wood Lecture will be held in ATC 101, on 27 June during the week of the Annual Scientific Meeting. Conference participants and the general public are both encouraged to attend. 

For more information on the Harley Wood Lecture, visit http://asa.astronomy.org.au/hwl.html.

The ASA 2018 Harley Wood Lecture is awarded to
Lisa Kewley

Lisa became interested in astronomy after her parents in South Australia encouraged engagement with the sciences and she was influenced by a high school physics teachers and participation in school stargazing camp.

She graduated from Adelaide University with a BSc (Hons) in astrophysics, studying cosmic and gamma ray bursts in distant galaxies. She then moved to Canberra to complete her doctorate in 2002 at the Australian National University at Mt Stromlo on colliding galaxies and how it influences star formation. In 2001 she spent time at Johns Hopkins University in the USA and a post-doctoral Smithsonian Fellowship and NASA Hubble Fellowship at Harvard University in Boston. After her Fellowship, Lisa gained a Hubble Fellowship at the Institute of Astronomy, University of Hawai’i where she used the largest telescopes in the northern hemisphere to probe galaxy formation and evolution in the early Universe.

While in the US, Lisa received the 2006 Annie Jump Cannon Award and the 2008 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize for outstanding achievement in observational astronomical research, and a National Science Foundation CAREER Award for her work.

Lisa returned to ANU and Mt Stromlo in 2011 as a Professor and ARC Future Fellow for the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics. She was elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2014 and gained an ARC Australian Laureate Fellowship in 2015.

Her most recent research combines stellar evolution and photoionization models with cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to predict how the ionising radiation changes in galaxies over the last 6 billion years, and she showed observationally that the ionising radiation in galaxies changed dramatically with time. Lisa’s expertise covers both optical and radio astronomy, observation and theory, as well as understanding local and distant galaxies.

Source: http://astro3d.org.au/about/our-people/professor-lisa-kewley/

Prize talk
Oxygen: Breathing in Stars

Life as we know it requires oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen. Yet the universe began with none of these elements. The elements responsible for life were produced in the deep recesses of stars over 13 billion years of cosmic time. How these elements assembled to form the dynamic universe that surrounds us and onto the nurturing planet that we live on are some of nature’s greatest mysteries.  The world's largest telescopes and the most powerful supercomputer simulations of galaxy formation and evolution show that the elements transform the way new stars are born and evolve, the way planets are formed around young stars, the way stars explode and die, and the way stars assemble into new galaxies.  We will take a dramatic journey with oxygen throughout the history of the universe from the the Big Bang to the present day. We will follow the birth and death of stars, the formation and evolution of galaxies, and the formation of planets, ending on our own planet earth and the oxygen that we are breathing today.  

This talk is for both adults and children.