Navigation News Annual Scientific Meeting Participants Program Posters Information for presenters HPC Live Helpdesk Events Welcome reception Social Outing to MBO Harley Wood Public Lecture ASA Conference Dinner Prizes ASA Student Prizes Anne Green Prize Bok Prize Charlene Heisler Prize David Allen Prize Harley Wood Lecture Louise Webster Prize Policies Sponsors HWSA 2018
News Annual Scientific Meeting News Participants Program Posters Information for presenters HPC Live Helpdesk Events Welcome reception Social Outing to MBO Harley Wood Public Lecture ASA Conference Dinner Prizes ASA Student Prizes Anne Green Prize Bok Prize Charlene Heisler Prize David Allen Prize Harley Wood Lecture Louise Webster Prize Policies Sponsors HWSA 2018

Charlene Heisler Prize

ASA Annual Scientific Meeting 2018

The Charlene Heisler Prize is awarded annually by the Astronomical Society of Australia for the most outstanding PhD thesis in astronomy or a closely related field, accepted by an Australian university. The thesis research must show outstanding excellence and originality.

The Prize consists of a medal together with an award of $500 and ASA membership for the following calendar year. The recipient is invited to present a paper on their PhD research at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Astronomical Society of Australia, where the prize will be presented.

 

 

This year’s prize goes to Anish Amarsi for his thesis “Three-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium radiative transfer and oxygen abundances in late-type stars” completed at the Australian National University and supervised by Martin Asplund.

 

For more information on the Charlene Heisler Prize, visit http://asa.astronomy.org.au/chp.php.

 

The ASA 2018 Charlene Heisler Prize is awarded to
Anish Amarsi

Anish is originally from New Zealand. After studying Natural Sciences at St Catharine's College, University of Cambridge from 2009 to 2013, Anish entered the PhD program at Mount Stromlo Observatory, ANU supervised by Martin Asplund.  Since 2017 Anish is a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany.